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2019 Reading, Literacy & Learning Virtual Conference


PC3 - Inaugural Gordon F. Sherman Neuroscience & Education Symposium Dynamic Research-Practice Collaborations: Realizing the Promise


Nov 7, 2019 8:00am ‐ Nov 7, 2019 11:30am

Standard: $20.00

Description

Dr. Sherman’s vision, leadership, scholarship, and humanity have touched countless lives. This annual symposium has been established in his name in recognition of that impact and to honor his unique and transdisciplinary contributions to neuroscience, education, and the International Dyslexia Association. The symposium’s aim is to provide a platform for interdisciplinary presentations and dialogue that advance future collaboration, leadership, and innovation at the nexus of research, practice, and policy.

Introduction

Dr. Sherman is known for seminal research establishing dyslexia’s brain basis, visionary leadership as IDA’s president, coining cerebrodiversity, and championing the needs and abilities in those with dyslexia. He’s also known for engaging presentations spanning the research-practice chasm and for translating findings into inspiring messages for parents and educators. In keeping with these themes, this session presents cutting-edge research and bidirectional neuroscience-education collaborations that improve the teaching-learning landscape for students with dyslexia.

Neuroscience and Education: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Ken Pugh

Rapid progress in understanding the genetic, neurobiological, and cognitive bases of reading problems coupled with new paradigms in support of brain-based learning and remediation has paved the way for the emerging field of educational neuroscience. To realize its promise, we need to develop novel, respectful, and innovative bidirectional partnerships between researchers and practitioners (something Gordon Sherman exemplifies better than most). We consider the current state of this process and what’s most needed right now to realize the promise and achieve practical outcomes.

The Promise of In-School Neuroscience: An Initial Report on Two Collaboratives

Nicole Landi

Despite advances in our understanding of the neural basis of reading and treatment response, there remain missing links between educational neuroscience research and practice. For example, this research is often conducted using large and expensive equipment, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which presents barriers for expanding this work to classroom-based research and for long-term longitudinal tracking. In this talk, initial findings are presented from a study that utilizes in-school EEG data collection to track children over longer periods to identify individual treatment-response profiles.

The Virtuous Cycle Between Education and Neuroscience: Neural Plasticity in Children With Dyslexia

Jason Yeatman

Research on individual differences in learning has led to the development of intervention programs to improve reading skills in young, struggling readers. However, a concern that remains is the extent to which short-term intervention programs are capable of changing the developmental trajectory of the brain’s reading circuitry. Participants learn about new findings that underscore the brain’s impressive capacity for plasticity when children are provided with reading instruction that is tailored to their needs.

Ken Pugh, Nicole Landi, Jason Yeatman, Jay G. Rueckl, and Mark S. Seidenberg have no relevant financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):

  • Ken Pugh, Ph.D., President and Director of Research; Senior Scientist, Haskins Laboratories
  • Nicole Landi, Ph.D. , Associate Professor, Psychological Sciences & CT Institute for Brain and Cognitive Sciences; Director of EEG Research; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology
  • Jason Yeatman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Washington
  • Jay G. Rueckl, Ph.D., Professor, University of Connecticut; Senior Scientist, Haskins Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, and Haskins Laboratories, University of Connecticut; Senior Scientist, Haskins Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, and Haskins Laboratories
  • Mark S. Seidenberg, Ph.D., Vilas Research Professor, Donald O. Hebb Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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