2017 Reading, Literacy & Learning Virtual Conference


IDA’s Annual International Conference is the premier professional development conference dedicated to dyslexia. The conference brings in experts from all over the world to educate attendees on the latest research, remediation, and more.

The Reading, Literacy and Learning Conference is held for both professionals and families and is attended by some 2,500 teachers, educators, and administrators, reading specialists, researchers, university faculty, psychologists, physicians, tutors, and parents.

This program is offered for up to 12.50 ASHA CEUs (various levels; professional area). IDA is approved by the Continuing Education Board of ASHA to provide continuing-education activities in speech-language pathology and audiology. ASHA CE Provider approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products, or clinical procedures.

Questions about ASHA CEUs should be directed to the Conference Department (conference@dyslexiaida.org).

ASHA ceus only available through November 7, 2018

Directions For ASHA CEU Paperwork Participation Form Credit Hour Calculation Form ASHA Evaluation Form Learning Outcomes

custom image


Sessions

The Role of Speech in Reading

Nov 8, 2017 8:00am ‐ Nov 8, 2017 11:30am

Identification: PC3

Credits: None available.

The symposium includes four presentations that will begin with a consideration of the speech- and auditory-related neural pathways involved in reading and conclude with practical discussions of speech-to-print instruction, including research with speech-to-print materials for instruction and remediation.

Learning Outcome:

  • RESEARCH: Examine research findings and implications for practice relevant to students with dyslexia and other language learning disabilities.

Disclosure: Margie Gillis, Piers Cornelissen,
Dennis L. Molfese, Victoria J. Molfese, Jeannine
Herron, and David A. Kilpatrick have no relevant
financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Margie B. Gillis, Ed.D., CALT, Founder and President, Research Affiliate, Literacy How, Fairfield University and Haskins Laboratories
  • Piers Cornelissen, Ph.D., Psychology Department, Northumbria University
  • Dennis L. Molfese, Ph.D., Director, Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Victoria J. Molfese, Ph.D., Department of Child, Youth & Family Studies, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Jeannine Herron, Ph.D., Founder & Director, Talking Fingers
  • David A. Kilpatrick, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology, State University of New York, College at Cortland
Standard: $20.00

Mathematical Literacy: Creating Instructional Models That Meet the Needs of Students With Dyslexia and Related Learning Disabilities

Nov 8, 2017 8:00am ‐ Nov 8, 2017 11:30am

Identification: PC4

Credits: None available.

We have long known that students with dyslexia and related learning disabilities often struggle in more than one academic area. Though we have developed models for delivering successful reading and language instruction in both initial and remedial instructional settings, we have not as yet developed a more unified approach to instruction for these individuals in mathematics. Just as evidence from neuroscience has validated approaches to literacy instruction, it has offered monumental revelations about a core deficit in mathematics. This evidence has profoundly shaped how we approach teaching mathematics at developmentally appropriate levels. When combined with our knowledge of the impact of language on learning, it suggests some universal guidelines for instruction. This symposium explores the impact of dyslexia and related learning disabilities in mathematics. It offers evidence-based practices for supporting students and suggests some strategies or lessons learned from our shared history of structured literacy instruction. Symposium presentations examine the challenges of initiating, building, and sustaining an instructional model that serves this specific population. Each presentation offers insights, examples, and evidence of successful instructional models, as participants collectively glean some universal truths about educating this population in the area of math. Audience participation is part of this practical symposium as we explore the meaning of an explicit, synthetic, analytic, structured, sequential, cumulative, and thorough approach to teaching mathematics. Finally, we offer resources and models of what is possible for educating in a way that is appropriate for all, but essential for some.

Learning Outcomes:

  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Assess the critical issues of adolescent literacy including the nature of the problem, differentiated language needs of students and effective instructional solutions (principles and practices).
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Discover the relationship between language development and acquisition of reading, written language and math proficiency.
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Discover the relationship between executive functioning and student learning and performance.
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Discover the relationship between executive functioning and student learning and performance.

Disclosure: Marilyn Zecher, Miles Baquet, Linda
Maleh, Jamie Hooper, Matthew Buchanan, J.
Concha Wyatt, Jen McAleer, Peter Morris, and
Christopher Woodin have no relevant financial or
nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Marilyn Zecher, M.A., CALT, Academic Language Therapist & Math Specialist
  • Miles Baquet, Academic Support Coordinator and Math Department Head, LA Key Academy
  • Linda Maleh, Founding Lead Teacher and Math Coordinator, The Shefa School
  • Jamie Hooper, Lead Teacher and Math Coordinator, The Shefa School
  • Matthew Buchanan, Instructor of MSM, Teaching Level, Math Teacher and Faculty Math Department Chair, Key School
  • J. Concha Wyatt, Fellow/AOGPE, CALT, Director of Teacher Training, Key School and Learning Center
  • Jen McAleer, Head of Middle School Mathematics, The Carroll School
  • Peter Morris, Head of Lower School Mathematics, The Carroll School
  • Christopher L. Woodin, Ed.M., Math Department Chairman, Landmark School
Standard: $20.00

Reading Intervention for Children and Youth With Reading Disabilities...

Nov 8, 2017 12:30pm ‐ Nov 8, 2017 4:00pm

Identification: PC5

Credits: None available.

There is emerging consensus on some overall parameters of effective intervention for children and youth who struggle with reading development, but relatively little insight into why some children respond readily and others show less response. Like reading itself, intervention outcomes are multidimensional, and our ability to measure decoding, word reading, and spelling progress is far superior to our capacity to assess changes in vocabulary, fluency, and reading comprehension. We know that it is easier to intervene earlier, but we do not fully understand the limits and the reasons why later reading intervention is so difficult.

Learning Outcomes:

  • ASSESSMENT: Examine issues related to the assessment of dyslexia and how assessment results can inform the selection of academic interventions.
  • READING, SKILLS, & STRATEGIES: Examine the effect of age and method of instruction on the development of early literacy.
  • RESEARCH: Examine research findings and implications for practice relevant to students with dyslexia and other language learning disabilities.
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Examine the conditions under which teachers can learn and apply understandings of language and literacy to more effective instruction of “at risk” students.

Disclosure: Maureen W. Lovett, Donald L.
Compton, Laura Steacy, and Robin D. Morris
have no relevant financial or nonfinancial
relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Maureen W. Lovett, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto
  • Donald L. Compton, Ph.D., Associate Director, Florida Center for Reading Research
  • Laura Steacy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Special Education, School of Teacher Education and Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University
  • Robin D. Morris, Ph.D., Regents Professor of Psychology, Georgia State University
Standard: $20.00

Assistive Technology for a New Generation

Nov 8, 2017 12:30pm ‐ Nov 8, 2017 4:00pm

Identification: PC6

Credits: None available.

For many years, the academic help provided to students with dyslexia was limited to remedial language instruction and resource support, including basic accommodations giving students extra time to complete assignments. While those traditional supports remain important, the rapid development of assistive technology has led to a dramatic increase in independence for dyslexic learners and allows them to thrive alongside their nondyslexic classmates. This engaging half-day symposium helps attendees understand the why and how of AT implementation in 21st-century classrooms. Presenters highlight the educational approach of the universal design for learning (UDL), and the latest and most effective AT tools are demonstrated and discussed. The session wrap ups with a testimonial from a college student who was once a struggling writer, but because of assistive technology, is now pursuing a degree in writing.

Learning Outcome:

  • TECHNOLOGY: Access potential applications of language based technology for direct instruction and/or accommodation for students with dyslexia and other language learning disabilities.

Disclosure: Jennifer Topple, Karen Janowski,
Annzie Hine have no relevant financial
relationships to disclose. Jamie Martin may
receive speaking fees and honoria. There are no
nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Jennifer Topple, M.S., CCC-SLP, Director of Assistive and Instructional Technology, The Howard School
  • Karen Janowski, M.S.Ed., Assistive and Educational Technology Consultant
  • Jamie Martin, B.A., Assistive Technology Consultant & Trainer, AT Solutions for Dyslexia
  • Annzie Hine, Student, Savannah College of Art and Design
Standard: $20.00

Opening General Session - Dyslexia Crossroads: The Intersection of Research and Practice

Nov 8, 2017 4:30pm ‐ Nov 8, 2017 6:00pm

Identification: OGS

Credits: None available.

Join us for a conversation with distinguished voices in the field of dyslexia research and practice. Together well discuss cutting-edge, dyslexia research, the role of research in interventions, and how we can more effectively align practice with this research.

Learning Outcome:

  • RESEARCH: Examine research findings and implications for practice relevant to students with dyslexia and other language learning disabilities.

Speaker(s):
  • Peggy McCardle, Ph.D., M.P.H., Peggy McCardle Consulting, LLC; Haskins Laboratories
  • Donald L. Compton, Ph.D., Associate Director, Florida Center for Reading Research
  • Benjamin Powers, Headmaster, Eagle Hill Southport School
  • Julie A. Washington, Ph.D., Professor and Program Director in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Georgia State University
  • Sara Arispe, Associate Superintendent, Fort Worth Independent School District
  • Maryanne Wolf, John DiBaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Director, Center for Reading and Language Research
Standard: $20.00

Thursday General Session - Creative Synergies Between Research and Practice: Working Together to Build Better Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Reading Disabilities

Nov 9, 2017 8:00am ‐ Nov 9, 2017 9:30am

Identification: TGS

Credits: None available.

The Samuel Torrey and June Orton Memorial Lecture

Creative synergies between research and practice: Working together to build better interventions for children and adolescents with reading disabilities

This lecture will attempt to explore some of the opportunities that accrue when practitioners and researchers enter each other’s worlds, engaging in meaningful dialogue that can reshape the practices of all for the better. Since IDA was formed in the 1920s, there has been great progress in our understanding of dyslexia and reading disorders, and IDA has led many initiatives to facilitate the development of sound assessment and teaching practices. Of great importance, throughout its history, IDA has fostered an enthusiastic alliance between research and practice. Despite the progress, as teachers, clinicians, and scientists, we have many unanswered questions about dyslexia and reading disabilities—what causes it? How early can it be predicted? Can prediction lead to prevention? How can we describe the important differences among individuals with reading disorders? What makes for effective intervention at different ages and stages of reading development, or for children with different profiles of comorbidity?

This presentation will share a story of my own career journey in reading intervention research, a story that spans more than 35 years, and started with a basic question articulated by a pediatric neurologist: Was it was even possible to conduct rigorous research on the treatment of learning disabilities? Why was there not a scientific literature to consult on effective treatment for these children? Closely working with valued colleagues and team members to create, evaluate, and refine approaches to teaching children with severe reading disabilities, we have met with both success and failure in our efforts. But we have always learned new lessons about reading disorders, and been able to pose better questions at the end of each intervention study. Lessons learned from our own research findings, as well as research evidence on the nature and course of reading disabilities and what a reading brain looks like, can inspire refined interventions. This body of evidence has led us to develop a set of research-based intervention programs for children, teens, and adults with reading problems. Some of the principles underlying these programs and lessons learned from their evaluation will be described. I will also raise emerging questions to help us consider new ways to improve interventions to facilitate the many people around the world, children, teens, and adults, still struggling to attain basic literacy skills.

Learning Outcomes:

  • IMPLEMENTATION: Gain an awareness of methods and practices that support the successful implementation of literacy interventions in schools and districts.
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Examine critical issues regarding the involvement of teachers in the implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI).

Speaker(s):
  • Maureen W. Lovett, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto
Standard: $20.00

Morphemic Awareness: From the Anglo Saxon Layer to the Latin and Greek Layer. It's Never to Early to Begin.

Nov 9, 2017 10:00am ‐ Nov 9, 2017 11:00am

Identification: T1

Credits: None available.

In this hands-on session, participants will learn how to transition their instruction from phonology and syllables to morphemes through morphemic awareness activities. Participants will learn how vital it is to prepare the brain for the challenge of decoding by phonemes and then syllables to decoding by morphemes. In order to prepare for this step, participants will learn hands on ways to support students in moving to the next level of decoding, while improving not only their decoding skills, but their vocabulary knowledge as well.

Learning Outcomes:

  • MORPHOLOGICAL INSTRUCTION: Analyze teaching higher level reading and vocabulary development through Morphological Awareness instruction.
  • MORPHOLOGICAL INSTRUCTION: Compare the role of morphological processing skills to the development of reading and language acquisition.

Disclosure: Sandra Donah has no relevant financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Sandra Donah, Ed.D., Director of Special Education, Hartford Public Schools
Standard: $20.00

Pennsylvania's Dyslexia Screening and Early Literacy Intervention Pilot: Bringing Reading Research and Best Practices to the Public School Classroom.

Nov 9, 2017 10:00am ‐ Nov 9, 2017 11:00am

Identification: T2

Credits: None available.

The 2017-2018 school year marks the third school year of implementation for this pilot that seeks to improve early literacy instruction, intervention, and outcomes. Presenters provide an overview of the essential components of the pilot, highlight preliminary outcomes and data, and share lessons learned. This pilot is proof that best practices in reading instruction and intervention can be implemented in public schools.

Learning Outcomes:

  • ADD/ADHD: Management of the ADHD student and the LD student in the classroom.
  • TEACHING/INSTRUCTION/INTERVENTION: Examine effective practices for teaching specific language comprehension strategies for the students who are struggling with reading.

Disclosure: Monica McHale-Small and Diane Reott have no relevant financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Practical, Validated Strategies for Reversing Students Reluctance to Write

Nov 9, 2017 10:00am ‐ Nov 9, 2017 11:00am

Identification: T3

Credits: None available.

Participants explore the various reasons why students develop a reluctance to express themselves in writing, including dyslexia, which involves more than just reading and the issue of dysgraphia. A variety of practical strategies and techniques for reversing this reluctance are described and clarified, including strategies dealing with handwriting, spelling, vocabulary, and information organization (generating ideas, planning, translating the ideas into written format). Participants obtain several proven strategies that they may immediately implement. Discussion involves the validity of each strategy.

Learning Outcomes:

  • HANDWRITING/WRITTEN LANGUAGE: Examine the importance of legible and fluent handwriting in order to make gains in reading, spelling and writing.
  • HANDWRITING/WRITTEN LANGUAGE: Identify effective practices and strategies for written language.
  • MULTISENSORY STRUCTURED LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION: Recognize the nature of dyslexia and related language learning disabilities and the role of multisensory structured language instruction (MSL).
  • READING, SKILLS, & STRATEGIES: Examine the role of vocabulary acquisition and ability in listening and reading comprehension, and in speaking and writing.

Disclosure: Regina Richards has no relevant financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Regina G. Richards, M.A., BCET, Board Certified Educational Therapist, Richards Educational Therapy Center, Inc.
Standard: $20.00

Early Screening Is Possible, Is Predictive, and Is Promising!

Nov 9, 2017 10:00am ‐ Nov 9, 2017 11:00am

Identification: T4

Credits: None available.

Typically, dyslexia screening is not considered until a child has fallen behind his or her peers in reading. Recently, a new screening tool was released for use with preschool children. Using a dynamic assessment approach, the Predictive Early Assessment of Reading and Language (PEARL) can be used to predict which children will struggle with phonological-awareness skills. With the ability to predict which students will struggle attaining reading-readiness skills, it is now possible to offer earlier intervention to prevent students from having reading difficulties in later grades.

Learning Outcome:

  • ASSESSMENT: Examine issues related to the assessment of dyslexia and how assessment results can inform the selection of academic interventions.

Disclosure: Katie Squires and Joanne Pierson have no relevant financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Speaker(s):
  • Katie E. Squires, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, Assistant Professor, Central Michigan University
  • Joanne M. Pierson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Founder and Partner, Literacy, Language, and Learning Institute
  • Lauren Katz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Partner, Literacy, Language, and Learning Institute
Standard: $20.00